Tag: Millenials

2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium

2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium

Toyota C-HR
Toyota C-HR

The 2018 Toyota C-HR coulda, woulda, shoulda. They say shortly before it appeared in dealerships as a Porsche, the 924 was set to arrive in Volkswagen dealer showrooms. The 2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium follows that same path, in that it was to be introduced as a Scion instead.

No matter though as it now seemingly fits into the edgier family that Toyota has become. One of the smaller Crossovers in the Toyota lineup, it’s a sharply creased, curvy round, futuristic-styled turn on a high-riding (well maybe not very high) hatchback that can answer several needs that maybe you might not have realized to this point.

Limited Power.

Toyota C-HR
Toyota C-HR

The 2018 Toyota C-HR is powered by a singular 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 144 hp and 139 lb-ft of torque. Power is delivered to the front wheels through a continuously variable transmission (CVT). There is no all-wheel-drive option.

Eighteen-inch wheels are standard offerings for this model, with automatic headlights, auto high-beams, and LED daylight running lights. Our two-tone, radiant green and iceberg-painted (turquoise and white?) C-HR is relatively well equipped, although for just a few more shekels, you can have the C-HR XLE Premium instead, which added fog lights, keyless entry and ignition, heated front seats (a great idea in Florida!) and driver’s side two-way power lumbar support. Finally, blind spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert complete the package which we think is a better, more complete offering than the base C-HR XLE model.

The interior is a hodge-podge of textures and features that work for the most part. It’s nothing that we haven’t seen before, and features a bit of hard plastic combined with fabric seats and a rather straightforward gear shift selector. This Toyota C-HR has a nice shape and continuity to the dashboard orienting itself towards the driver, although we have a bone to pick with the audio head unit that seems as though it was taken off the shelf from a soon to be out of business car audio installer.

And yes, we know how all you millennial’s like apps. But that doesn’t mean we like to see apps on our in-car entertainment. Instead of burying navigation and other functions within the menu, why not just have a button on the face of the unit that says Navi? Or Maps. You managed to put an icon of a telephone handset on the face of the unit, why not some other shortcuts? Speaking of apps and telephones, at this point in time, the C-HR is still lacking Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity.

Buyers will likely also check out the Buick Encore, Nissan Juke, and Hyundai Kicks when shopping this segment.

The rear seat is somewhat cavern-like in that shorties will likely fall deep into the seats and not be able to see out the windows. It can comfortably carry two and in a pinch squeeze a third person into the second row but for all intents and purposes we consider the C-HR more of an urban lifestyle vehicle than a suburban kid hauler and utility vehicle. So instead why not just fold down the rear seats and use it as a medium-sized crossover vehicle instead.

Toyota C-HR
Toyota C-HR

The C-HR includes a standard 7.0-inch audio display screen, adaptive cruise control, 10 airbags, dual zone climate control 18-inch wheels and Bluetooth. Step up a few dollars more and get the Premium model with push-button start, keyless entry, a blind spot monitoring system, folding mirrors and heated seats.

Drive Time.

We liked the way the 2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium looks and handles, but not so much how it moves. That is our big fall down in the car overall. We actually like the way the Toyota C-HR handled. It doesn’t have much power, especially when you consider that this non-turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine only produces 144 hp and 139 lb-ft of torque. It sends its traction to the front-wheel-drive transaxle via a continuously variable transmission (CVT), which, when judged by a strictly seat-of-the-pants feel, gives the impression that it is both noisy, and slow. Particular moves, while in traffic, need to be planned deliberately, unless you’ve had designs all along on being the hood ornament of the big 18-wheeler that is rapidly filling up your rear-view mirror.

We find there’s an excessively high amount of noise that works its way into the cabin. It’s not that it’s unexpected, but it’s something that seems to be lacking in some of the C-HR’s competition.

Drive with ease and you will all be ok.

 

2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium.

Story and photos by Mark Elias

Cylinders:                                   I4

Displacement:                          2.0-liters

Power:                                        144 hp @ 6100 rpm

Torque:                                      139 lb-ft @ 3,900 rpm

Fuel:                                           Regular

Drive Type                                FWD

Gearbox:                                  CVT

Tire Size:                                  225/50R18

Unladen Weight:                   3,300-pounds

Length:                                    171.2-inches

Width:                                     70.7-inches

Height:                                     61.6-inches

Wheelbase:                              103.9-inches

Cargo Volume:                      19.0 cubic feet rear seat up

36.4 cubic feet rear seat folded

City:                                           27

Highway:                                  31

Combined:                               29

[Best_Wordpress_Gallery id=”117″ gal_title=”2018 Toyota C-HR XLE Premium”]

 

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2017 Nissan Rogue Sport – First Drive

2017 Nissan Rogue Sport – First Drive

NissanUSA’s headquarter city of Nashville is one of the fastest growing cities in America. Official estimates state that around 85 and as many as 100 new residents move to the city each day. Many of them will become urban dwellers, and Nissan thinks they are the perfect customers for the 2017 Nissan Rogue Sport.

The 2017 Nissan Rogue Sport in Nashville.

Billed as a “right-sized” vehicle for Millennials and others, they may be on to something. The newest member of the Nissan Rogue family, the Rogue Sport joins its slightly larger sibling in a quest for total CUV world domination. With sales figures otherwise starting to slump, the Rogue family is a bright spot in the lineup with sales of 27,400 units, which was an increase of 18-percent in April 2017, alone.

Built for City Service.

The five-passenger Rogue Sport shares a platform with its larger garage mate, although it now rides lower, has a 2.3 inch-shorter wheelbase, and 12.1-inch less overall length than its big brother Rogue. The net result is a vehicle that is easier to move, maneuver, and park within a city center than many other CUVs in service today.

The 2017 Nissan Rogue Sport is available in three trim levels ranging from base S, mid-level SV and top-shelf SL trims. All of the vehicles made available to us by Nissan were of the SL variant, which is what we will base our report on. Likely competition will come from the Honda C-RV, Chevrolet Trax and Mazda CX3.

Power comes from a 2.0-liter naturally-aspirated four-cylinder engine that utilizes direct-injection to feed the four pots in the mill. This small-but-somewhat-mighty four banger produces 141 horsepower and 147 lb-ft of torque. It is mated to an Xtronic continuously variable transmission that is also equipped with a standard Eco Mode option for increased fuel economy.

Nissan Rogue Sport’s 2.0-liter engine.

In its standard configuration, the Rogue Sport is equipped as a front wheel drive (FWD) vehicle. Buyers in the Snowbelt regions can opt for Nissan’s intuitive all-wheel drive system (AWD), which provides an all-wheel-drive bias at launch, which then reverts back towards the front wheels, again in an effort to save fuel. This compact CUV rides on a MacPherson-style independent front suspension and a multilink independent rear kit equipped with a 19mm stabilizer bar.

My SL tester was equipped with nearly every available item included in Nissan’s Platinum package. That’s in addition to heated seatbacks, 19-inch alloy wheels, fog lights, heated outside mirrors, seats and steering wheel and leather wrapped shift knob. Available safety features included blind spot warning, rear cross traffic alert, forward emergency braking, lane departure warning, and prevention, intelligent cruise control and forward emergency braking with pedestrian protection.

Interior decorating.

Smartly appointed inside, the Rogue Sport featured a new “only as needed” interior design that was spacious and efficient at the same time. Featuring nothing truly frivolous, it seemed that everything was in its place and within a short arm’s length reach of the driver’s seat. We quickly found comfort in the six-way power adjustable driver’s seat, and thought the rear seat offered adequate legroom, if even for just a short while. Fold the rear seats down and you will quickly realize up to 61.1-cubic feet of storage space.

The Nissan Rogue Sport’s Interior.

Our SL variant was zooted out with everything from leather seating to a sunroof and six-speaker AM/FM/SiriusXM audio system. With more cars opting for larger screens, we felt the 5.0-inch color display monitor that also serves to show the available Around View Monitoring system with Moving Object Detection, was just a touch on the smallish side. While not featuring Apple CarPlay, our Rogue Sport was equipped with Siri Eyes Free, which we think of as the next best thing.

But not all was perfect inside. We would deduct a couple of points for the low-powered (1mA) single USB connection at the base of the center stack, seeing that the first move most people make after buckling up is to plug in their phone charging cable. If the driver gets first dibs, the rest of the passengers are all odd men- or women out. Even then, and owing to the low amperage rating of the USB port, the amount of charge realized may be very low. In other words, it takes longer than usual to charge an iPhone battery. As always, YMMV.

Drivetime.

Ergonomically speaking, the 2017 Nissan Rogue Sport fit drivers ranging from a big guy and a small girl to everything else in between. Power was adequate for most urban driving situations, which saw us stop and start with such frequency we felt we were delivering the US Mail. We can see most buyers will be urban dwellers, and this is where the safety features of the Rogue Sport will really shine, especially some of those like the Forward Emergency Braking with Pedestrian detection.

Rogue Sport in the City

Acceleration was adequate in the sense that everyone buying the Sport knows it’s not a speed demon. Instead like a Slo-Poke All-Day Sucker, it’s an all-day steady cruiser that offered good road feel while negotiating both city and country drives. In highway situations, even with the low-profile sport tires, I felt the ride of the Rogue Sport displayed extreme poise, while offering little in the way of road noise-a feature that really surprised me. So quiet on the highway, we only heard the engine and the CVT transmission when we kicked it down a notch to pass slower moving traffic. Nissan officials tell us the ride becomes even quieter with the taller sidewalls of the 17-inch wheels.

Don’t even think of doing any serious off-roading in the Nissan Rogue Sport. It’s just not that kind of beast. Instead figure it will do everything to take you through the urban jungle and back. And that’s just what most people want in a compact CUV these days.

2017 Nissan Rogue Sport

Story and Photos by Mark Elias. Additional Photos by Nissan USA.

Rogue Sport S FWD $21,420 USD
Rogue Sport SV FWD $23,020 USD
Rogue Sport SL FWD $26,070 USD
Rogue Sport S AWD $22,770 USD
Rogue Sport SV AWD $24,370 USD
Rogue Sport SL AWD $27,420 USD
   

 

Key Specs

Cylinders:                                    I-4

Displacement:                            2.0-liter

Power:                                          141 hp @ 6,000 rpm

Torque:                                         147 lb-ft @ 4,400 rpm

Fuel System:                                Petrol Direct Injection

Fuel:                                               Regular

Drive Type                                    FWD or available All-Wheel-Drive

Gearbox:                                       Xtronic With Eco Mode Switch

Tire Size:                                       19-inch

Length:                                          172.4-inches

Width:                                           72.3-inches

Height:                                          63.3-inches

Wheelbase:                                   104.2-inches

 

AWD                  FWD

City:                                             24                        25

Highway:                                    30                        32

Combined:                                  27                        28

[Best_Wordpress_Gallery id=”22″ gal_title=”2017 Nissan Rogue Sport”]